Call Now: 24Hr Addiction Hotline 800-662-8079 Who Answers?
Withdrawal.org / Addiction Treatment / Deaths Caused by Overdose in the U.S.

Deaths Caused by Overdose in the U.S.

Call 800-662-8079 to speak with an addiction treatment counselor.
Who Answers?

The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) 2014 World Drug Report states that globally there were 183,000 drug-related deaths in 2012, with opioid overdose the largest category. Drug overdose was responsible alone for 38,329 deaths in the US in 201o, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

Over the past 15 years, overdose deaths in the US have steadily increased. For four years in a row, the number of US citizens whose deaths were drug-related exceeded the number of fatalities in road traffic accidents (33,561 in 2011). In 2011, there was nearly five people each hour who died from drug overdose. Today drug overdose is the leading cause of accidental death in the United States.

It’s Time For an Intervention

It is clear tat there is a need for intervention in the United States when drug overdoses are killing more people each year than traffic accidents, gun violence and other documented fatal accidents. Studies show that 60% of all fatal overdoses have prescription drug to blame. States and Federal government office have put in place laws to prevent abuse of prescription drugs, as well as refocusing their efforts and addressing the problem.

Good Samaritan Laws

Activists are working to ensure all states put in place 911 Good Samaritan laws. This offers legal protection to anyone seeking medical help for themselves or others in the incident of a drug or alcohol overdose. This is done in the attempt to combat overdose deaths, as many people are too afraid too seek help for drug overdose for fear of incarceration or mandatory treatment. Vermont and New Jersey have passed this law during a 2013 legislative session.

Expanding Laws for the Use of Naloxone

There is also a great push to make a life saving medication, Naloxone, readily available to first responders and loved ones of addicts. By expanding laws on Naloxone, this opiate overdose medication will save thousands of lives.  There have been seventeen states of expand the laws around the use of Naloxone, reducing opiate over dose rates by up to 50% in those areas.

The Importance of Laws to Protect Those Who Have Overdosed

Good Samaritan laws and laws to expand access to Naloxone are important in the prevention of fatal drug overdose in the United States, as well as Globally. However these laws alone will not protect the public from the effects drugs have on society as a whole. It is important the both on a state and federal level the crisis of fatal drug overdose is taken seriously and all steps needed for prevention and treatment are taken to ensure that overdose statistics do not continue to rise with more lives lost.

I NEED TO TALK TO SOMEONE NOWI NEED TO TALK TO SOMEONE NOW 800-662-8079Response time about 1 min | Response rate 100%
Who Answers?

Pin It on Pinterest

Shares

How the helpline works

For those seeking addiction treatment for themselves or a loved one, the Withdrawal.org helpline is a private and convenient solution.

Calls to any general helpline (non-facility specific 1-8XX numbers) for your visit will be answered by American Addiction Centers (AAC), a paid advertiser on Withdrawal.org.

AAC representatives are standing by 24/7 to discuss your treatment options. These representatives work solely for AAC and will discuss whether an AAC facility may be an option for you. This helpline is offered at no cost to you and with no obligation to enter into treatment. Neither Withdrawal.org nor AAC receives any commission or other fee that is dependent upon which treatment provider a visitor may ultimately choose.

For more information on AAC’s commitment to ethical marketing and treatment practices, or to learn more about how to select a treatment provider, visit AmericanAddictionCenters.org. If you wish to explore additional treatment options or connect with a specific rehab center, you can browse top-rated listings or visit SAMHSA.