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Fire Department and Emergency Worker Rehab and Treatment

Call 800-662-8079 to speak with an addiction treatment counselor.
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Did you know there are more than 1.1 million firefighters in the United States? This includes approximately 756,000 volunteer firefighters and 344,000 career firefighters?

While there may not be as many emergency workers scattered throughout the country, there are hundreds of thousands who do whatever it takes to provide care to those in need.

Those who work as firefighters and emergency workers, either full-time or on a volunteer basis, are faced with stressful situations day after day. These professionals enjoy their work, however, it can take a toll on their mind and body over time.

With all this in mind, it is common for firefighters and emergency workers to rely on drugs and/or alcohol to better cope with their daily life. While there is no excuse for substance abuse, it is easy to see why these people believe it could improve their life.

Unique Needs of Firefighters and Emergency Workers

Some people go to an office everyday, working on a computer in a controlled environment. There is no denying the fact that every job has some degree of stress associated with it. That being said, firefighters and emergency workers are faced with some of the most stressful situations imaginable.

With this in mind, these professionals require specialized treatment. They require a treatment program that focuses on beating their addiction, while also addressing a variety of mental health issues, which can include:

  • Anger management
  • Coping with violence
  • Guilt resolution
  • PTSD therapy

Each patient is evaluated upfront, ensuring that the appropriate treatment program is put into place. This helps increase the chance of success.

How to Find the Best Help

Even when a firefighter or emergency worker realizes they need addiction treatment, these professionals are often times too proud to reach out for assistance. They are concerned about what others will think of them, as well as what it will mean to their future career.

If you are seeking addiction treatment, it is important to note that you don’t have to share your trouble with anybody. Of course, reaching out to others can often times make the process easier.

You can get started by taking the following steps:

  • Search online for rehab facilities that provide treatment specifically for firefighters and emergency workers.
  • Discuss your situation with your superior, asking if they can point you in the right direction. You may not be the first person within your department to be faced with an addiction.
  • Share your addiction with your family. They will give you the support necessary to get your life back on track.

Treatment is Available

Every year, U.S. fire departments respond to more than 370,000 fires. Of these, the result is billions of dollars in damage as well as thousands of deaths and injuries.

It is the stress of working as a firefighter or emergency response professional that can lead to drug and/or alcohol use. Fortunately, there are treatment facilities throughout the country dedicated to helping these people.

We are here to help you find the treatment center that best suits your needs, both personally and professionally. For free assistance finding a treatment facility, contact us today at 800-662-8079.

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Where do calls go?

For those seeking addiction treatment for themselves or a loved one, the Withdrawal.org helpline is a private and convenient solution.

Calls to any general helpline (non-facility specific 1-8XX numbers) for your visit will be answered by American Addiction Centers (AAC).

We are standing by 24/7 to discuss your treatment options. Our representatives work solely for AAC and will discuss whether an AAC facility may be an option for you. Our helpline is offered at no cost to you and with no obligation to enter into treatment. Neither Withdrawal.org nor AAC receives any commission or other fee that is dependent upon which treatment provider a visitor may ultimately choose.

For more information on AAC’s commitment to ethical marketing and treatment practices, or to learn more about how to select a treatment provider, visit our About AAC page. If you wish to explore additional treatment options or connect with a specific rehab center, you can browse top-rated listings or visit SAMHSA.